Art

Art curriculum design

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Sketching

Theme Park Drawing

 

Children develop a transferable skill which will be developed further later on in the year when working on painting and sculpture. 

 

Self-Portrait

 

Children improve their sketching technique moving onto texture and tone to suggest volume and depth.

Cave art

 

Children improve their mastery of drawing focusing on form, line and shape.

Roman architecture

 

Children learn to use varying pencil grades to create pattern and texture and will use their knowledge of space to add depth.

Norse art

 

Children develop techniques to depict reflection, shadow and movement. Children work on layering, using varying grades of pencil including charcoal.

Still life – William Hunt

 

Children improve their mastery of drawing specifically looking at background, foreground and middle ground and realism.

Painting

Object painting – plane

 

Children begin to develop early painting skills by focusing on how to create secondary, warm and cold colours, choosing the correct colour combinations and have chosen appropriate brush sizes to complete their painting.

Object painting – bus

 

Children begin to experiment with a range of paints such as acrylic and water colour and move onto exploring different brush marks and the effects these provide. They learn about how adding black and white can create different tones and what effect this has on their masterpiece.

Cartouches

 

Children improve their mastery of painting by further exploring the colour spectrum and moving on to mixing paints to create tertiary colours. Their colour vocabulary begins to develop as they learn about colours swatches and they learn about the properties of different paint and how these alter your masterpieces when using them on different surfaces, such as clay.

Pottery

 

Children learn about tone and hue and think about how the light in their classroom will change the effect of their artwork. They continue to develop their painting skills on different surfaces and evaluate the effects of this.

Murals

 

Children use viewfinders to create a collaborative piece.

Lowry

 

Children further improve their mastery of painting by specifically looking at perspective.

Sculpture

Sea model

 

Children begin to develop their sculpture skills for the first time. They develop their fine motor skills by learning how to construct and join objects to create a solid structure.

Mountain structure

 

Children begin to understand the importance of taking care when using different materials and how to manipulate them into different shapes and textures.

Animal model

 

Children progress from creating one solid structure to creating a sculpture with multiple components.

Athenian architecture

 

Children progress to now carving different materials to use in their masterpiece. They learn how to attach sculptures to different surfaces and address the challenges this creates.

Bridges

 

Children progress from carving paper and card to create a masterpiece on their display to carving, joining and constructing a variety of materials of different textures. They learn how to attach and join different textiles to create one solid structure which can stand upright on a variety of surfaces.

Building

 

Children now move on to applying their sculpting skills to creating a structure and landscape using man made and natural materials.

How do children progress in sketching in Art?

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Vocabulary

Grip

Lines

Pressure

Control

Overlap

Perspective

Horizontal

Vertical

Form

Portrait

Position

Texture

Textile

Atmosphere

Proportion

Features

Smudging

Materials

Pattern

Imitate

Smudging

Scale

Refine

Alter

Grade

Design

Features

Charcoal

Chalk

Texture

Tone

3D

Evaluate

Authentic

Patterns

Shade

Carving

Reflection

Proportion

Grade

Outline

Authentic

Still life

William Henry Hunt

Subject

Background

Foreground

Tone

Grade

Realistic

Knowledge

•Children know the correct position to hold a pencil and how to adjust the pressure.

•Children know how to hold a ruler to draw a horizontal and vertical line.

•Children know the names of different colours.

• Children know that drawing smaller and larger images create the illusion of perspective.

•Children know that different parts of the human body are different sizes.

•Children know the regal positioning for a portrait.

•Children know the clothing Kings and Queens typically wore for portraits.

•Children know what texture means.

•Children know what shading and smudging means.

•Children know how to evaluate their art work appropriately.

•Children know the different materials and tools used in cave paintings.

•Children know how to draw a variety of shapes and lines and how to adjust pencil grip.

•Children know the different shapes used in cave paintings.

•Children know how to create different textures.

•Children know different grades of pencil.

•Children now how to alter their artwork.

•Children know how scale changes the perspective of a picture.

•Children know how to imitate a picture.

•Children know what chalk and charcoal are.

•Children know that charcoal and chalk present differently to a graphite pencil.

•Children know the different between rough and smooth textures.

•Children know what tone is.

•Children know how to create a 3D effect.

•Children know which grade of pencil creates different effects.

•Children know what Norse art is and when it was used.

•Children know the patterns, shapes and areas of light and shade in Viking dragon carvings. 

•Children know what reflection means.

•Children know the names of different shapes.

•Children know the shape of a dragon.

•Children know how light and dark is represented.

•Children know what effect smudging has.

•Children know different grades of pencils.

•Children know what effect they can achieve with different grades of pencil.

•Children know how to evaluate their artwork.

•Children know what still-life means.

•Children know who William Henry Hunt is.

•Children know what background and foreground is.

•Children know what the subject of a picture means.

•Children know what tone means.

•Children know what different tones are used in William Henry Hunt’s artwork.

•Children know different grades of pencil.

•Children know what makes artwork realistic.

•Children know how to evaluate and improve their artwork.

Skills

•Children can use the correct grip to hold a pencil and can adjust the pressure of this grip.

•Children can hold a ruler accurately and using the pencil grip draw both horizontal and vertical lines.

•Children can tell you the names of different colours and choose the identified colour to use in their drawings.

•Children can draw larger and smaller images and shapes and position them at correct points on the page to create the illusion of perspective.

•Children can use pencil and ruler skills to draw three or more complex shapes and add detail through sketching and colouring.

•Children can use eggs and sausages technique to draw human form accurately.

•Children can use knowledge of human form to draw a person in the regal position.

•Children can fill a space using a variety of different lines and drawing techniques to create texture.

•Children can use knowledge of texture to add detail to clothing and background.

•Children can smudge pencil work.

•Children can draw facial features that are accurately sized.

•Children can draw a whole body portrait including facial features that are all appropriately sized.

•Children can create a list of tools and materials used in Stone Age cave paintings.

•Children can use their pencil and ruler skills to draw a variety of simple and complex shapes and lines.

•Children can combine different lines and shapes, overlap and smudge to create different textures.

•Children can choose the correct grade of pencil for different parts of their masterpiece.

•Children can edit and improve their drawing.

•Children can refine their masterpiece.

•Children can draw lines and shapes using chalk and charcoal accurately without breaking the pencil or paper.

•Children can use the correct grade of pencil and smudging and shading techniques to create rough and smooth textures to use in their masterpieces.

•Children can identify tone in images.

•Children can create different tones using a variety of pencil grades and colours.

•Children can use sketching and smudging techniques to create a 3D effect.

•Children and draw a 3 coliseum.

•Children can refine their drawing to add detail and make alterations.

•Children can evaluate their artwork.

 •Children can use various shapes and lines including techniques learned in previous year groups to create different textures.

•Children can use different grades of pencil including charcoal and chalk to create areas of light and shade.

•Children can use a mirror to reflect images.

•Children can reflect and draw various shapes.

•Children can sketch an outline of a dragon.

•Children can smudge their sketch to create different effects.

•          Children can identify the correct grade of pencil for different parts of their artwork.

•          Children can refine their masterpiece through evaluations.

•Children can compare different still-life drawings.

•Children can explain who William Henry Hunt was and discuss his artwork.

•Children can create the illusion of perspective with a background and foreground.

•Children can draw a subject of a picture and ensure their masterpiece builds around this subject.

•Children can create different tones in their artwork.

•Children can identify the correct grade of pencil to use for different sections of their artwork.

•Children can make their artwork realistic through studying the work of William Henry Hunt.

•Children can evaluate their artwork in detail.

How do children progress in painting in art?

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Vocabulary

Circle                    

Brush

Primary colour

Secondary colour

Warm colours

Cool colours

Colour wheel

Mix                      

Painting

 

Colour                        

Tone

Light/Dark                  

Grip

Position

Scale

Brush mark

Tones                         

 Material

Tools  

Colours                     

 Clay

Tone

Tertiary colours

 

Theme                        

Surface

Tone & hue                 

Position

Tint                                 

Evaluate

Colour swatch

Curved

 

Mural                          

Elaborate

Colour scheme

Colour match

Design

Collaborative

Warm and cool colours

Lowry                  

Depict

Tools                      

 Perspective

Horizon                  

Contrast

Harmony              

Composition

Knowledge

•Children know how to partition a circle using a ruler.

•Children know what primary and secondary colours are.

•Children know how to mix paint.

•Children know the work of different artists.

•Children know what a colour wheel is.

•Children know how to hold a paintbrush.

•Children knows that the size of the paintbrush changes its accuracy.

•Children know who Amy Jonson was.

•Children know what warm and cool colours are.

•Children know what they like and dislike about their masterpiece.

•Children know what colour the bus was which Rosa Parks famously refused to move from.

•Children know the difference between light and dark.

•Children know the meaning of tone.

•Children know how to alter the tone of a colour.

•Children know how to partition a shape using a ruler.

•Children know the properties of acrylic and water colour paint.

•Children know the correct position to hold a paintbrush.

•Children know when to use different sized paintbrushes.

•Children know how to create a window effect.

•Children know what a cartouche is.

•Children know the shapes and lines used on a cartouche.

•Children know the colours used in a cartouche.

•Children know how to make tertiary colours.

•Children know what hue means.

•Children know how to alter the tone of a colour.

•Children know how to write their name in hieroglyphics.

•Children know what paint to use on different materials.

•Children know which size brush to use for different sections of their masterpiece.

•Children know the lines, shapes and colours used in Greek pottery.

•Children know what a colour swatch is.

•Children know how to alter the tone and hue of colours.

•Children know how the position of a picture alters its perception.

•Children know how to paint on a curved surface.

•Children know which paint to use on different materials.

•Children know which brush size to use on different materials and backgrounds.

•Children know what Bonampak murals are.

•Children know what way of life was like for the Mayans.

•Children know what a mural is.

•Children know the features of their chosen mural.

•Children know what stories are depicted in Mayan artwork.

•Children know what colour schemes are used in murals.

•Children know which brushes and paint to use to draw certain lines and shapes.

•Children know how to evaluate and refine artwork.

•Children know how to work collaboratively.

•Children know who Lowry is and his VE day painting.

•Children know what tools and medium Lowry often used.

•Children know what colour palette Lowry used.

•Children know the meaning of perspective.

•Children know how to alter perspectives.

•Children know the purpose of a horizon line.

•Children know contrasting colours and images.

•Children know how to mix paint to recreate a limited colour scheme.

•Children know how to make their artwork authentic.

•Children know which colours work in harmony.

•Children know the composition of their artwork is important.

Skills

•Children can use a ruler to partition a circle into six segments.

•Children can correctly identify primary and secondary colours.

•Children can mix primary colours together to create secondary colours and use these in their artwork.

•Children can identify warm and cool colours.

•Children can explore the work of famous artists and identify features they like.

•Children can create a colour wheel using paint and an appropriate paint brush.

•Children can paint strokes with various different sized paintbrushes.

•Children can draw and paint a picture of an aeroplane.

•Children can evaluate their artwork once completed.

•Children can identify the colours in an image.

•Children can identify light and dark colours.

•Children can alter the tone of a colour by adding white and black in atone strip.

•Children can partition a bus into sections using a ruler held correctly.

•Children can explain the benefits and negatives of different paint.

•Children can hold a paintbrush in the correct position depending on its size.

•Children can choose the correct sized paintbrush for different objects in their masterpiece.

•Children can add white and shapes to their image to create a glass effect.

•Children can sensibly evaluate their work and identify positives and negatives.

•Children can explain what a cartouche is and what they were used for.

•Children can replicate some of the shapes and lines used within original cartouches.

•Children can list the colours used in a cartouche.

•Children can mix primary and secondary colours to create tertiary colours.

•Children can use different paints to represent different hues.

•Children can use tools to write their name in hieroglyphics on clay.

•Children can choose the correct sized paintbrush for parts of their masterpiece.

•Children can evaluate which paint will work best on their surface (clay).

•Children can evaluate and refine their artwork.

•Children can draw different images commonly used in Greek pottery.

•Children can paint lines and shapes using appropriate colours identified in Greek pottery.

•Children can choose the appropriate paint to use on different materials.

•Children can identify the correct sized paintbrush to use for different sections of their masterpiece.

•Children can alter the tone and hue of colours they want to use.

•Children can create their own colour scheme and mix and create their own paint to use in their artwork.

•Children can paint correctly proportioned human figures.

•Children can paint on a curved surface without distorting their image.

•Children can refine and alter their artwork.

•Children can identify the features of Bonampak murals.

•Children can infer information about the way of life for Mayans using the murals.

•Children can depict a short story through painting three small images.

•Children can replicate original design features to add realism to their artwork.

•Children can choose correct colour schemes and create colours to use in their artwork.

•Children can independently choose the correct brush and paint to use.

•Children can evaluate their work and fine their masterpiece.

•Children can work as part of a group to create a piece of artwork that ‘works’ as an entire piece.

•Children can explain who Lowry is and describe his VE day painting.

•Children can name and discuss the tools Lowry used in his paintings.

•Children can identify the colour pallets Lowry had access to and can identify different tones within them.

•Children can create perspective through sizing and positioning.

•Children can create several different perspectives through sizing and positioning.

•Children can use contrasting colours to display meaning.

•Children can create colours including varying tones and hue through paint mixing.

•Children can identify the correct tool and paint to use to make their masterpiece authentic.

•Children can create colours which work in harmony.

•Children can compose their masterpiece so that they can achieve a 3D effect with each object being well proportioned.

How do children progress in sculpture in art?

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Vocabulary

Sea

Structure

Card

Mood

Form

Cutting

Folding

Construct

Materials

Shape

Replica

Paper

Card

Features

Evaluate

Construct

Painting

Recycled

Materials

Designing

Landscape

Building

Textures

Structure

Packaging

Architect

Acropolis

Model

Cut

Diagonal

Perspective

Original

Cardboard

Stone

Surface

Bridge

Functional

Design

Features

Tools

Materials

Structure

Surfaces

Research

Model

Materials

Papier-mâché

Wood

Realistic

Knowledge

•Children know what the sea is.

•Children know that the sea can look different at different times.

•Children know that cutting and sticking card and paper can create 3D form.

•Children know that you can overlap materials.

•Children know you can create different moods with shapes.

•Children know different materials cut differently.

•Children know you can create a variety of shapes with one piece of paper/card.

•Children know how to shape paper and card into different shapes.

•Children know to use scissors to cut materials.

•Children know to use glue and folding to stick paper and card together.

•Children know the key features of Sugarloaf Mountain.

•Children know how re-create the environment surrounding Sugarloaf Mountain.

•Children know how to design a structure and surrounding.

•Children know how to combine a variety of materials.

•Children know how to create different textures and shapes from a variety of materials.

•Children know how to build a 3D structure.

•Children know how to manipulate different materials.

•Children know how to evaluate their artwork.

•Children know the artwork of the Athenian architect Mnesikles and his work the Greek acropolis.

•Children know how to cut cardboard.

•Children know to cut diagonal lines.

•Children know how to fold and stick cardboard to different materials.

•Children know how to create perspective using materials.

•Children know how to create different textures to replicate original design features.

•Children know to make a solid structure which can withstand movement and re-positioning.

•Children know how to attach their completed 3D structure to a wall.

•Children know how a bridge is built.

•Children know about the functional design features of a bridge.

•Children know about the design features of famous bridges.

•Children know the properties of multiple materials.

•Children know which materials are best suited for different purposes.

•Children know which tools to use for certain tasks.

•Children know which tools to use on different materials.

•Children know how to join different materials together.

•Children know how to evaluate their work.

•Children will know to use various forms of media to conduct independent research.

•Children will know the properties of different materials.

•Children will know how to join a variety of materials together.

•Children will know the difference between manmade and natural materials.

•Children know how to be responsible with their choice and use of materials.

•Children will know how to select appropriate materials.

•Children will know how to select appropriate tools.

•Children will know how to design an entire structure.

Skills

•Children can explain what the sea is.

•Children can explain how the sea looks different at different times and begin to explain why.

•Children can cut different shapes out of paper and card using scissors.

•Children can use glue to stick pieces of paper and car together.

•Children can overlap materials to create different shapes.

•Children can depict different moods through cutting soft and sharp edge shapes.

•Children can use scissors to cut through paper and card accurately.

•Children can create multiple different shapes through cutting and sticking.

•Children can explain what they like and dislike about their sculpture.

•Children can bend, shape and construct different materials to create 3D shapes and structures.

•Children can use scissors to cut and shape a variety of materials.

•Children can use glue to stick a variety of materials to a surface and to each other.

•Children can use folding techniques to create different shapes using a variety of materials.

•Children can use drawing and painting skills to create a well-rounded structure including the surrounding environment.

•Children can explain what recycled means and identify products they can use as part of their project.

•Children can design and plan a sculpture to create.

•Children can create a structure using a variety of materials following their design plan.

•Children can imitate the shapes and textures found in nature using a variety of materials. 

•Children can create solid structures using single and multiple pieces of material.

•Children can collect a variety of recycled materials to use in their sculpture.

•Children can identify positive and negatives of their sculpture and identify what they would do differently.

•Children can discuss and identify the work of Athenian architect Mnesikles and his work on the Greek acropolis.

•Children can accurately cut cardboard using scissors.

•Children can cut diagonal lines.

•Children can construct different parts of cardboard using their diagonal slots.

•Children can attach various materials using a variety of techniques.

•Children can create perspective using sizing and shaping of different materials.

•Children can create perspective using positioning of shapes and objects on their sculpture.

•Children can create different textures including stone by manipulating and gluing a variety of materials.

•Children can sculpt a solid structure that can withstand movement.

•Children can attach a sculpture to a vertical wall without damaging it.

•Children can demonstrate how a bridge is built and its working features.

•Children can explain the importance of the functional features of a bridge.

•Children can problem solve to decide which materials they want to use for their sculpture.

•Children can explain why certain materials are not suitable for their sculpture.

•Children can select appropriate tools for the materials they have chosen.

•Children can select he appropriate medium to join their selected materials together.

•Children can join their materials together to create a solid structure with functional and design features.

•Children can evaluate their work and explain what they would do differently next time.

•Children can conduct independent research using the internet, books and other media.

•Children can evaluate the proprieties of different materials.

•Children can join various materials together and to other backgrounds.

•Children can use a variety of art skills to create a well-rounded product.

•Children can explain what a manmade and natural product is.

•Children can choose and collect materials to use in their sculpture that they have recycled.

•Children can select the appropriate tool to help shape different materials safely and accurately.

•Children can evaluate and refine their sculpture.