Design and Technology

Overview of Progression in Design and Technology at Craven Primary Academy

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Construction

Planes/Gliders

 

Build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable.

 

Castles

 

Explore and use mechanisms such as levers, sliders, wheels and axles, in their products.

 

Shelters

 

Construction using joining techniques with sheet materials and/or construction kits.

 

 

Parthenon

 

Apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures.

 

 

 

Temple

 

Understand and use mechanical systems in their products, such as gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages.

 

 

Bridges

 

Understand and use electrical systems in their products, such as series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors.

 

 

Textiles

Collage

 

Sort threads and fabrics and group fabrics and threads by colour and texture.

Patchwork

 

Create a patch that represents own personality and character using running stitch and overstitch.

Key rings

 

Join two pieces of fabric and attach features.

Drawstring bag

 

Create a bag with a hem to create drawstring.

 

Embroidery patchwork

 

Use embroidery with back, blanket, chain and stem stitching.

An innovative, functional and appealing product that is fit for purpose

 

An innovative, functional and appealing product that is fit for purpose aimed at a particular individuals or groups.

Food

Fruit kebab

 

Design and make a simple dish using a range of fruits.

 

 

Children develop cutting and chopping skills and know how to use utensils safely.

Sandwiches

 

Combine ingredients to make a healthy sandwich.

 

 

Children understand that our food comes from many different places.

Baking – Bread

 

Make dough and bake bread.

 

 

Children apply combine a range of ingredients and use their measuring skills. They also learn how to knead.

 

 

Baking – Pizza

 

Make dough for pizza bases and chop toppings to make a tasty snack.

 

Children understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.

Boiling – Stew

 

Combine ingredients that have been chopped and peeled. Boil safely to make a traditional stew.

 

Children understand what makes a rich environment for growing foods and raising sheep and cattle.

 

Boiling – sauces and stocks

 

Combine ingredients that have been chopped and peeled. Boil safely.

 

Children understand what ingredients grow in our country and what they can grow at home.

Overview of Progression in Design and Technology (Food technology) at Craven Primary Academy

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Vocabulary

Fruit

Vegetable

Grow

Chop

Utensils

Knife

Chopping board

Carbohydrates

Dairy

Protein

Healthy

Climate

Mix

Diet

Balanced

Recipe

Bake

Knead

Rolling pin

Preheat

Savoury

Slice

Grate

Boil

Simmer

Stir

Drain

Season

Sauces

Stocks

Peel

Knowledge

•Children know the meaning of the words ‘fruit’ and ‘vegetables’ and can sort produce into these categories.

•Children know that some fruits and vegetables grow in the UK.

•Children know why it is important to wash our hands before preparing food.

•Children know why it is important to wash our hands before preparing food.

•Children know that food can be divided into different groups. They know ‘fruit’, ‘vegetables’, ‘dairy’, ‘protein’ and ‘carbohydrates’. They can sort produce into these categories.

•Children know that some food comes from different countries and can say why this is the case.

•Children know that a healthy diet is a balanced diet across the food groups.

•Children know that ingredients can be combined to make different fillings and this can be done through layering or mixing depending on ingredients.

•Children know that a healthy diet is balanced and varied across the food groups.

•Children know the utensils needed to make bread dough.

•Children know the ingredients needed to make bread dough.

•Children know a range of products that are produced in Italy and Greece.

•Children know a range of traditional Italian and Greek dishes.

•Children know how the products studied are grown and why they grow well in that climate.

•Children know a range of traditional South American dishes.  

•Children know how the products studied are grown, caught and reared.

•Children know how to follow a step by step recipe to make a final product.

•Children know the difference between simmering and boiling and can identify this in a practical activity.

•Children know how seasonality in the UK can impact on the products we can produce.

•Children know what ingredients they can grow at home themselves with limited space and resources.

•Children know how to chop a range of vegetables.

•Children know how to improvise when they have limited ingredients or unavailable products.

•Children know that ratio needs to be applied when following a recipe and adapting it to make a given number of servings.

Skills

Design

•Children can give opinions about existing food products that they have tried.

Make

•Children can chop fruit using utensils safely.

•Children can wash their hands correctly.

Evaluate

•Children can evaluate their products by saying what they would do differently next time.

Design

•Children can give opinions about existing food products that they have tried and can discuss the flavours and textures.

Make

•Children can chop food using utensils safely.

•Children can wash their hands correctly.

Children can combine ingredients to make a filling using layering and/or mixing.

Children can butter a slice of bread.

Evaluate

•Children can evaluate their products by saying what they would do differently next time and why.

 

Design

•Children can compare food products by identifying similarities and differences.

•Children can suggest ingredients which would improve and enhance a recipe.

•Children can create a labelled diagram of their design.

•Children can explain their choices and back them up with research they have carried out.

Make

•Children can wash their hands correctly.

•Children can measure amounts in kg/g, l/ml.

•Children can knead dough.

Evaluate

•Children can evaluate their products by talking about the texture and flavour and considering the views of others.

Design

•Children can carry out research into traditional dishes to inform their designs.

•Children can create a labelled and annotated diagram of their design.

Make

•Children can wash their hands correctly.

•Children can measure amounts in kg/g, l/ml accurately.

•Children can knead dough.

•Children can slice ingredients using utensils safely.

•Children can grate cheese safely.

Evaluate

•Children can evaluate their products by talking about the texture and flavour and considering the views of others.

Design

•Children can carry out research into traditional dishes to inform their designs.

•Children can create a plan detailing the ingredients, utensils and equipment they need using measurements where appropriate.

Make

•Children can wash their hands correctly.

•Children can measure amounts in kg/g, l/ml accurately.

•Children can slice and chop ingredients using utensils safely.

•Children can stir ingredients safely using the correct utensils.

•Children can drain ingredients.

•Children can serve a dish safely.

Evaluate

•Children can evaluate their products by talking about the texture and flavour and considering the views of others.

Design

•Children can plan and design a menu for a number of people.

•Children can use their knowledge of ratio to adapt given recipes to create a given number of servings.

Make

•Children can wash their hands correctly.

•Children can measure amounts in kg/g, l/ml accurately.

•Children can slice and chop ingredients using utensils safely.

•Children can peel vegetables safely.

•Children can stir ingredients safely using the correct utensils.

•Children can drain ingredients.

•Children can serve a dish safely.

Evaluate

•Children can evaluate their products by talking about the texture and flavour and considering the views of others.

Overview of progression in Construction in Design and Technolog

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Vocabulary

Fold

Cut

Stick

Glue

Cellotape

Scissors

Levers                          Sliders

Wheels                        Axles

Battlements                Moat

Arrow loops                Bailey

Tower                          Barbican

Drawbridge               Portcullis

Shelter

Prototype

Skara Brae

Saw

Cross section

Column

Cylinder

Strengthen

Reinforce

Gears

Pulleys

Levers

Cams

Linkages

Switches

Bulbs

Buzzers

Motors

Knowledge

•Children know that their design informs their creation.

•Children know that materials can be joined in different ways – glue and cellotape. 

•Children know that a product can be improved.

 

•Children know the different parts of a castle.

•Children know that materials can be joined in different ways – glue, cellotape, paper clips and masking tape.

•Children know a range of mechanisms such as levers, sliders, wheels and axles.

•Children know where we see some of the mechanisms in the real world.

•Children know a selection of different shelters and the intended purpose.

•Children know the key parts of a shelter.

•Children know what homes/shelters were made from in the Stone Age.

•Children know some of the inventions and discoveries made in the Bronze and Iron Age.

•Children know what Greek temples were built from.

•Children know what Greek temples were used for.

•Children know how columns were used to support the structures.

•Children know how structures can be strengthened, stiffened and reinforced.

 

•Children to know the general shape of a temple.

•Children to know different mechanical systems and how these work.

•Children to know how to strengthen a structure.

•Children to improve their structure with mechanical systems to modernise their design.

•Children know the different components in a circuit.

•Children know how to set up a circuit.

•Children know a range of types of bridges and the similarities and differences between the designs.

Skills

Design

•Children can describe the shape of a model.

•Children can use a template to design their model.

•Children can identify the resources they will need.

•Children can identify the equipment they will need.

•Children can choose materials that they will use.

•Children can give simple reasons for their choices.

Make

•Children can fold paper.

•Children can join materials using glue and/or cellotape.

Children can cut materials and use scissors safely.

•Children can follow their own design.

Evaluate

•Children can record their measurements.

•Children can say what was successful and unsuccessful.

•Children can make a suggestion as to how their model could be improved.

•Children can listen to others’ suggestions and ideas.

Design

•Children can take inspiration from their research.

•Children can identify the resources they will need.

•Children can identify the equipment they will need.

•Children can choose materials to use and explain their choices.

•Children can identify which part of their model will move.

•Children can consider how to join parts – cellotape, glue, paper clips and masking tape. 

•Children can draw a diagram of their model and label key features.

Make

•Children can follow their own design.

•Children can join materials in a range of ways.

• Children can cut materials and use scissors safely.

Evaluate

•Children can edit and adapt their design to include a moving part.

•Children can say what they would change to improve their model.

•Children can listen to others’ suggestions and ideas.

•Children can identify if their moving mechanism is successful and if not the can explain why.

•Children can make some suggestions as to how it could be improved.

Design

•Children can identify some materials that shelters are made from today and in the past.

•Children can make comparisons between designs.

•Children can draw and label their design.

•Children can list the materials needed.

•Children can identify the steps needed to make their product.

Make

•Children can make a prototype.

•Children can use saws and scissors safely.

•Children can select and use a range of tools.

Evaluate

•Children can express a preference about the likes and dislikes of their finished product.

•Children can consider ways in which their design or product could be improved.

•Children can list the ways in which the finished product meets the design criteria.

•Children can children compare ideas, methods and approaches in their own and others’ work and say what they think and feel about them.

•Children can identify how they can develop their work further.

•Children can evaluate how their shelter could be improved in the Bronze and Iron Age due to inventions and discoveries made.

Design

•Children can identify similarities and differences between ancient structures and those we see today.

•Children can explain how ancient structures have influenced buildings today.

•Children can decide which materials are best to use and give reasons for their choices.

•Children can create labelled design and accurately explain choices, backed up by research.

•Children can create cross sectional sketches

•Children can list the materials needed.

•Children can identify the steps needed to make their product.

•Children can create annotated sketches to show their design.

•Children can identify the tools needed to make their temple

Make

•Children can join more complex shapes.

•Children can apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures.

Evaluate

•Children can give ways to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce their structure.

•Children can evaluate their product against the design criteria.

•Children can suggest changes they need to make to improve their product.

•Children can give views on possible changes they could make to improve their design.

Design

•Children can create cross sectional sketches to show their design.

•Children can create exploded diagrams to show their design plan.

•Children to consider various materials that can be used to strengthen models.

•Children to design a temple, using facts they know from previous lesson.

Make

•Children to create a simple structure of a temple. 

•Children to join mechanical systems to a structure for more movement.

Evaluate

•Children can give ways to strengthen their structure.

•Children can evaluate their product against the design criteria.

•Children can suggest changes they need to make to improve their product.

•Children can give views on possible changes they could make to improve their design.

Design

•Children compare designs in the past to the present day.

•Children justify their choices using research they have carried out. 

•Children can plan the costing of their design using a fictional value.

Make

•Children include electrical systems in their model, such as series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors.

•Children can use a glue gun safely.

•Children can use a saw safely.

•Children can add a moving part to their model.

Evaluate

•Children can evaluate their product against the design criteria.

•Children can suggest changes they need to make to improve their product.

•Children can give views on possible changes they could make to improve their design.

Overview of Progression in Design and Technology (Textiles) at Craven Primary Academy

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Vocabulary

Colour

Texture

Collage

Overlap

Materials

Thread

Sew

Running stitch

Overstitch

Patchwork

Fabric

 

Research

Keyring

Template

Felt

Stitch

Soft

Woven

Wool

Alternative

Decorate

Carve

Embroidery

Patches

Design

Innovative

Functional

Appealing

Properties

Aesthetic qualities

Knowledge

•Children know what a collage is

•Children know that different materials have different or similar textures.

•Children know that some materials can be grouped together.

•Children know how to represent an image using fabrics.

•Children know how to thread a needle using a running stitch

•Children know how to thread a needle using an overstitch

•Children know how to attach fabrics through sewing using one or both of the techniques

 

•Children know how to carry out research using a range of sources

•Children know how to create a template

•Children know how to stitch two pieces of felt together

•Children know how to use other stitching techniques to add mode detail to their keyring

 

•Children know how a drawstring is created.

•Children know the purpose of a hem.

•Children know of Norse Art.

•Children know that there are different types of stitches used for different purposes.

•Children know what makes a product appealing to different audiences. 

•Children know that there are different types of stitches used for different purposes and what they are used for. 

Skills

Design

•Children can describe the texture of a fabric.

•Children can choose a material where the colour corresponds to what it represents e.g. blue for the sea.

Make

•Children can sort fabrics and threads into groups.

•Children can make a collage using various materials.

Evaluate

•Children can discuss choice of material and colour of their collage piece.

Design

•Children can describe the shape and colour of existing products.

•Children can make choices to represent their own personality and what is important to them.

•Children can choose materials they will use.

Make

•Children can thread a needle.

•Children can sew an overstitch using a guide and then move to fabric.

•Children can sew a running stitch using a guide and then move to fabric.

Evaluate

•Children can discuss their running stitch technique and overstitch technique and what they would do differently next time.

Design

•Children can carry out research by gathering data.

•Children can use a basic template and change it slightly to use as their design.

Make

•Children can cut out their final template design.

•Children can join two pieces of felt together by stitching them together.

•Children can attach features on their final pieces such as buttons etc.

Evaluate

•Children can discuss their final keyring with others.

•Children can ask others of their opinions on their final piece.

Design

•Children can draw a labelled diagram of a bullae.

•Children can choose from various materials and research designs.

•Children can come up with a few possible designs of a bullae bag.

Make

•Children can practise a stitched hem where a drawstring is enclosed.

•Children can make their own bullae bag.

•Children can create a second bullae bag using different materials.

Evaluate

•Children can compare their own designs, if made more than one bullae.

•Children can compare their bullae and give each other feedback.

•Children can begin to consider what they could have done different.

•Children can evaluate their product against the design criteria.

Design

•Children can explore items that cannot be carved and only decorated with embroidery.

•Children can come up with three designs of embroidery patterns on a patch.

•Children can identify stitch types they will use on their final design.

Make

•Children can use back, blanket, chain and stem stitching.

•Children can create a square patch of material with an embroidery design.

•Children can add more detail using threads, needles and sequins.

Evaluate

•Children can discuss their final design as a class.

•Children can evaluate their product against the design criteria.

•Children can discuss changes on their final designs.

Design

•Children can research existing products and evaluate them based on their functions and aesthetics for particular audiences.  

•Children can choose materials most suited for their final design basing their choices on function and aesthetics.

•Children can create a detailed annotated sketch for their design.

•Children can create a template for their design. 

Make

•Children can make their final piece using materials of their choice.

•Children can use more than one stitching technique for their chosen final design.

Evaluate

•Children can give each other feedback on their final pieces.

•Children can evaluate their product against the design criteria.

•Children can carry out any small amendments to improve their final piece.