Geography

Geography Curriculum Design

Our geography currciculum content is placed mainly in relation to the history curriculum so that where there are natural links and overlaps, knowledge of both subjects strengthens learning and gives children a deeper and more well rounded understanding of their topic. In Year 1, geography is kept with the children's locality so they can develop early geography skills by using familiar places and landmarks. Understanding of countries, continents, oceans etc is built up over the course of KS1, so that it can support the children in their understanding of where the civilizations they study in KS2 were situated.

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Autumn

Local area 

 

Children develop their local geographical knowledge to be able to answer the question ‘Where do I live?’ in detail. They gain an understanding of the countries in the UK.

 

UK in relation to the Wider world

 

Children develop geographical of the wider world including the seven continents and five oceans. Children use compass directions.

Settlements in the UK

 

Children study gain an understanding of what settlers look for in a location.

Features

 

Children study the physical feature, volcanoes, in detail. They explore human features including buildings. 

Scandinavia

 

Children explore how a place has changed over time.

British Empire

 

Children explore the beginnings of trade links.

Spring

Local area

 

Children develop their knowledge of the local area and create simple maps using basic symbols and keys.

North America

 

Children develop their geographical knowledge and compare the weather patterns and basic features of America to the UK.

Egypt

 

Children complete an in-depth study in to the River Nile identifying the importance of the Nile and the importance of a river in a settlement.    

Features

 

Children study the physical feature, mountains, in detail and locate a range of physical features across Greece.

North America

 

Children carry out an in-depth study of North America.

Relationships

 

Children explore countries relationships with others and look at how this affected trade with the UK.  

Summer

Local Coastal Town

 

Children explore the wider local area by carrying out a study of a local costal town, naming and locating human and physical features.

South America

 

Children develop an understanding of the equator, North and South Poles. They compare the physical and human features of the UK to Brazil.

Climate zones

 

Children study the major biomes, climate zones and vegetation belts across the world.

Modern European Study

 

Children explore the physical geography of both countries by studying rivers, mountains and volcanoes. They also explore the climate zones of these countries and the natural distribution of resources within the countries.

Water

 

Children study the physical feature, rivers, closely. They study the water cycle and the impact of water on the landscape, environment and our lives. 

Economy/Trade

 

Children study the natural distribution of resources and trade links. They explore this in relation to the local area and South America.

What vocabulary will the children learn in Geography?

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Autumn

Country

Capital

Village                  Town

City

Coast 

Near

Far

Left                       Right

Above 

Below

Address

Compass                 Regions

Seas                        Continent

Europe                    Africa

Asia                         Australia

North America       South America

Antarctica

North                      

South

East                       

 West

Pacific

Atlantic

Indian

Southern

Arctic

Orkney

Skara Brae

Human characteristics

Physical characteristics

Communities

 

Mount Vesuvius

Italy

Pompeii

Volcanoes

Architecture

Digital Maps

Germany

    Denmark

The Netherlands

Scandinavia

Settlers

Northumbria

Mercia 

East Anglia

Essex                            Kent

Sussex                          Wessex

Oslo

Trading               Industry

China                 India

British Empire

Import

Export

East India Company

Isambard Kingdom Brunel

Spring

Symbol

Key

Port

Maritime

Sea

Island

Arctic Ocean

Pacific Ocean

Caribbean Sea

Atlantic Ocean

Indian Ocean

Southern Ocean

Weather patterns

River Nile

Egypt

Latitude

Longitude

Equator

Northern/Southern Hemisphere

Coastline

Source, mouth and delta (in relation to water)

Dam

Climate

Greece

Crete

Peninsular

Mainland

Mount Olympus

River Haliacmon

 

Caribbean

Central America

Grand Canyon

Niagra Falls

Time zones

Panama Canal

Hoover Dam

Biome

Meridian

Temperate

Axis

Allies

Seasonality

Russia

Japan

China

Germany

Summer

Beach

Cliff

Coast

Harbour

Shop

Sea

Route

 

Season

Spring

Summer

Autumn

Winter

Equator

North Pole

South Pole

Brazil

River

Mountain

Climate

Vegetation

Biomes

Artic

Arctic circle

Equator

Temperature

Adapt

Habitat

 

Natural resources

Climate

Temperature

Temperate

Mediterranean

Temperate

Arid

Subtropical

Deposition

Tributary

Bay

Waterfall

Erosion

Downstream

Delta

Floodplain

Basin

Meander

Mouth

Source

Bank

Upstream

Oxbow

Lake

Valley

Trade

Import

Export

Fairtrade

Global

Supply Chain

International

What knowledge will the children learn in Geography?

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Autumn

•Children will know that the UK is made up of four countries and each country has its own capital.

•Children will know and recognise the flag of each of these countries.

•Children will know the difference between villages, towns and cities.

•Children will know the physical geography of Hull and understand that it is close to the coast.

•Children will know various features and landmarks of Hull.

•Children will know what an address is and why it is useful.

•Children will know directional language: near, far, to the left/right, above/below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

•Children will know that the UK is located in Europe.

•Children will understand that Europe is a continent.

•Children will know that a continent is made up of a group of countries.

•Children will know where Europe is on a world map.

•Children will know the names of the other continents of the world.

•Children will know what oceans are and that there are five major ones: Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, Southern, Arctic.

•Children will know the directional language of North, East, South and West.

•Children will know the locations of various well-known castles within the UK.

•Children will know what an island is and the benefits of living on one.

•Children will know how to compare different islands of varying sizes.

•Children will know where Skara Brae is on a map.

•Children will know why people chose to settle on Skara Brae.

•Children will know that Skara Brae was a successful farming community due to its location and physical features.

•Children will know that human characteristics of an area are due to the behaviour of the people who live there whereas physical characteristics are down to the natural development of the planet.

Children will know where Italy is on a map and that it is in the continent of Europe.

•Children will know the physical features of Italy, including its mountain ranges and rivers.

•Children will know the human features of Rome, the capital of Italy.

•Children will know the landscape of Naples.

•Children will know the differences between mountains, hills and volcanoes.

•Children will know how volcanoes are formed.

•Children will know of the impact of volcanoes on people’s lives.

•Children will know about the Pompeii disaster.

•Children will know about the geographical impact of the Romanisation of Britain.

•Children will know about Hadrian’s wall in detail.

•Children will know that the Anglo Saxons came from Germany, the Netherlands and Denmark. Children will be able to locate these countries.

•Children will know why their locations made Britain a suitable place to relocate to.

•Children will know about the different Anglo Saxon settlements of Northumbria, Mercia, East Anglia, Essex, Kent, Sussex and Wessex.

•Children will know about the human and physical characteristics of Anglo Saxon villages.

•Children will know why the Anglo Saxons chose certain areas of Britain to live in and why they didn’t live in others.

•Children will know geographical, human and physical changes of Britain from the Anglo Saxon times to the present day.

•Children will know why many settlements are near rivers.

•Children will know about the capital of Norway, Oslo.

•Children will know that the Victorian period was one of the most dynamic periods in history and there were many inventions that had an effect on human and physical geography.

•Children will know the countries that made up the British Empire.

•Children will know of reasons why Britain wanted to establish an Empire and why they chose certain countries, in geographical terms.

•Children will know about imports and exports and trading links with other countries which drew upon the natural resources of their land.

•Children will know about the human geography that changed as a result of the industrial revolution.

•Children will know about the growth of major towns and cities due to the industrial revolution.

•Children will know about Isambard Kingdom Brunel and his impact on physical and human geography.

•Children will know about modern day towns and cities, along with their history and current predicaments.

Spring

•Children will know which sea Hull is nearest to (North Sea).

•Children know what at island is.

• Children know that we live on an island.

•Children will know what a port is and that Hull has one because it is on a river and close to the sea.

•Children will know that towns and cities have factories, farms, houses, offices, shops, etc.

•Children will know what an aerial photo is and how they are useful.

•Children will know why maps are used and how they can make their own.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

•Children will know the seven continents of the world.

•Children will know the five oceans of the world.

•Children will know where North America is on the map and the oceans that surround it.

•Children will know about weather patterns and how they compare between Britain and the North America.

•Children will know what the terms longitude, latitude, equator and northern/southern hemisphere mean.

•Children will know about the major countries of Africa, along with the physical features of the continent.

•Children will know that the River Nile is the longest river in the world.

•Children will know about the source and mouth of the Nile.

•Children will know what a delta is and why it is important.

•Children will know about the positive and negative effects of the Aswan High Dam on the Nile.

•Children will know both ancient and modern uses of the River Nile.

•Children will know how different parts of the word have different climates and know that this links to temperature and rainfall.

•Children will know where Greece is, linking this to their previous knowledge of other locations.

•Children will know that Greece has approximately 2000 islands.

•Children will know that Greece is surrounded by the Ionian Sea and the Mediterranean Sea.

•Children will know about Greece’s climate, as well as its human and physical features.

•Children will know about maps of countries that indicate land level by using different colours.

•Children will know that Greece is 80% mountainous as a result of this.

•Children will know that Mount Olympus is a mountain, building upon knowledge of Vesuvius from Autumn term.

•Children know that mountains store and deliver water to rivers.

•Children will know the features of mountains.

•Children will know about the continent of North America and how it is organised into areas such as the Caribbean and Central America.

•Children will know that different parts of the world have different time zones, linking this to knowledge of longitude and latitude previous learned.

•Children will know about the Grand Canyon and Niagra Falls, including how they were formed physically over millions of years.

•Children will know about landmarks such as the Panama Canal and the Hoover Dam.

•Children will know that the Mayans lived in Mexico and northern Central America, in nations that are known as Guatemala, Belize, Honduras and El Salvador in the present day.

•Children will know the eight points of a compass.

•Children will know the lines of latitude and longitude, the equator, the northern hemisphere and the southern hemisphere.

•Children will know how the physical geography of Central America impacted the lives of the Mayans

•Children will know where key countries who were involved in the war are located.

•Children will know the flags of these significant countries.

•Children will know and understand why Hull, due to its physical and human features, was a target for bombing during the Blitz.

•Children know how climate affects the types of food a country produces.

•Children know the foods produced by Britain during the war time.

•Children know why Germany invaded other European countries.

•Children will know the human geographical impact of the war campaign upon the UK, including how towns, cities and transport networks required substantial rebuilding.

Summer

•Children will know basic physical features of a coastal town.

•Children will know basic human features of a coastal town.

•Children will know symbols in a basic key.

•Children will know that there are four seasons.

•Children will know what weather in each season is like in the UK.

•Children will know where the equator, North and South Poles are on a world map.

•Children will know that there are different weather patterns around the world in relation to the equator and North and South Poles.

•Children know that countries closer to the equator are warmer.

•Children know what the weather in the North and South Poles are like.

•Children know physical and human features of Brazil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

•Children know the major biomes around the world and their key features.

•Children know where a range of plants and animals live across the world.

•Children know that the equator is an imaginary line around the world.

•Children know that animals’ behaviours change in different seasons.

•Children know that animals and plants adapt.

•Children know why some plants grow better in different parts of the world than others.

•Children know we eat some plants and animals.

•Children know the main causes of habitat destruction and know how this leads to extinction of some species.

 

 

•Children know that Italy and Greece are located in Europe.

•Children know a variety of natural resources in Greece and Italy.

•Children know that resources are distributed.

•Children know the climate zone in Italy and Greece.

•Children know the names of the twelve countries and two territories of South America.

•Children know the names of some cities, mountains, rivers and topographical features in South America.

•Children know about different climates such as temperate, arid and subtropical.

•Children know the process of erosion and deposition.

•Children can know how The Andes were formed.

•Children know the water cycle.

•Children know why Hull is prone to flooding.

•Children know that houses are built in areas which are precarious for flooding and have an understanding of how these human features can impact the geography of our world.

•Children know the features of a river.

•Children know some products we trade in the UK.

•Children know some of the countries the UK trade with.

•Children know that Hull is a port.

•Children know products found or built in the local area.

•Children know of products that are imported to the UK from South America.

•Children know some of South America’s strongest industries.

What skills will the children develop in Geography?

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Autumn

•Children can use simple directional language.

•Children can identify each of the 4 countries that make up the UK by using a simple map.

•Children can explain where they live using the learned details and appropriate knowledge.

•Children can use a simple map of the local area and explain where local amenities are located.

•Children can locate the UK on a world map.

•Children can use a map to identify the 7 continents.

•Children can use a map to identify the 7 oceans of the world.

•Children can use simple directional language, building on that learned in year 1 with: north, east, south and west.

•Children can identify physical features of a location including: beaches, seas, oceans and rivers.

•Children can use simple compass directions to navigate a location.

 

•Children can identify physical features of an environment region using maps and other sources.

•Children can identify human characteristics of Skara Brae by using historical sources that reveal the geographical nature of the settlement.

•Children can use a world map to identify Italy, noting its physical features.

•Children can identify the human and physical features of a major European capital (Rome).

•Children can compare human and physical features of two or more different places within a country.

•Children can explain what a volcano is and how these are different to mountains or hills.

•Children can use diagrams to depict and explain how a volcano is formed.

•Children can identify the impact volcanos have on Pompeii by exploring sources that detail its human and physical geography.

 

•Children can use a range of sources – both historical and geographical – to explain the impact that the Romanisation of Britain had on its human and physical geography.

•Children can use a world map to identify Germany, the Netherlands and Denmark and explain why Britain would be an appealing target for them to invade.

•Children can identify the human and physical features of the UK during a specific time in history, comparing this to the modern day geography of Britain.

•Children can compare and contrast two modern day European cities, presenting their findings on the human and physical geography using the correct terminology.

•Children can explain how the use of land has changed over time, considering the geographical factors.

•Children can use a range of sources to identify the impact that the Industrial Revolution had on the human and physical geography of the United Kingdom, as well as the wider world as part of the British Empire.

•Children can identify the human and physical features of the countries of the British Empire, finding the countries on a blank map.

•Children can confidently discuss reasons – using age-appropriate geographical terminology – the human and physical reasons for Britain constructing its Empire.

•Children can use a range of geographical sources to present findings on imports, exports and trade that developed globally during this time.

•Children can explain the movement of people from the countryside into the cities at this time, considering the human impact of this.

•Children can identify and explain the impact of Isambard Kingdom Brunel on physical and human geography.

•Children can use a range of sources – both historical and geographical – to compare human and physical geographical changes of three modern-day UK towns and cities, considering economic activities and functions.

 

 

Spring

•Children can label the countries of the UK on a map, including capital cities and relevant seas, building upon previous skills.

•Children can use aerial photos to identify Hull landmarks.

•Children can use aerial photos to spot human and physical features that they have learned.

• Children can make a simple map that uses basic symbols in a key.

•Children can follow a simple map.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

•Children can independently use a map to identify the 7 continents.

•Children can independently use a map to identify the 7 oceans of the world.

•Children can compare and contrast weather patterns between Britain and North America.

•Children can use technology and coordinates of landmarks to show understanding of longitude and latitude.

•Children can use maps, atlases and globes to find physical features of continents and countries.

•Children can use geographical sources to build a fact file for the River Nile, including location, length and human/physical features.

•Using geographical knowledge, children can explain and detail the impact – both positive and negative - of human elements upon rivers, such as a Dam.

•Children can use their knowledge of climate to explain the similarities and differences between the climates of two or more countries.

•Children can use a world map to identify Greece, noting its human and physical features.

•Children can compare human and physical features of two or more different places within a country.

•Children can explain how Mount Olympus and Mount Vesuvius are different, linking this to knowledge of mountains and volcanoes.

•Children can use geographical resources to research climate of a range of locations.

•Children can use land level indicators on maps to come up with ideas about new locations.

•Children can present information in a variety of ways using taught geographical terminology, including human and physical features, population, capitals, location, etc.

•Children can identify and locate new countries by using digital maps, atlases and globes.

•Children can identify the latitude and longitude of a given country using a suitable map.

•Children can use terminology such as northern/southern hemisphere and equator to talk about the location of a region, country or continent.

•Children can explain the concept of time zones and how the time is different depending on what area of the world you are in.

•Children can research and compile informative texts relating to the physical and human features of an unfamiliar country.

•Children can use the eight points of a compass in order to provide information about a country’s location with increased accuracy.

•Children can plot locations accurately using four and six figure grid references.

•Children can research and give reasons as to how the physical geography of the land that they lived on contributed towards the lives of the Mayans.

•Children can independently locate and identify countries across a range of continents using the geography skills that they have previously learned.

•Children can use they knowledge of climates to give reasons why certain foods grow in different parts of the world.

•Children can carry out research and give geographical reasons as to why Germany invaded the countries it did, thinking about physical features as well as possible human features.

•Children can identify, using a range of geographic sources, the impact of world war ii on Britain’s landscape, considering the physical and human features and changes that have occurred.

Summer

•Children can ask questions about a location to find out more about it.

•Children can describe a simple route using directional language gained earlier in the year and can use a simple map.

•Children can describe physical and human features they observe in a location.

•Children can construct a simple map of a location they have visited.

 

 

 

 

 

•Children can make simple comparisons between two countries.

•Children can describe the weather patterns in all four seasons in the UK.

•Children can recognise and describe landmarks from observations they have made.

•Children can use and construct basic symbols in a key.

•Children can describe key features of major biomes.

•Children can describe an environment using their observational skills.

•Children can describe how the temperature changes in relation to the equator.

•Children can describe the features of animals and plants and explain how this helps them survive in their environment.

•Children can describe how an animal adapts to suit the environment.

•Children can give their own views about habitat destruction.

•Children can explain how some plants and animals end up on our tables.

•Children can use a range of maps to locate countries.

•Children can describe key features of countries using maps.

•Children can use maps with grid references, symbols and keys.

•Children can use the points of a compass on maps.

•Children can describe key physical and human features of countries using maps.

•Children can describe the climate in different locations.

•Children can carry out research about a country using a range of sources.

•Children can make comparisons between two countries by describing similarities and differences.

•Children can describe some geographical changes that have occurred over time.

•Children can locate the twelve countries, two territories, cities, mountains, rivers and topographical features of South America.

•Children can describe the various climate zones in South America.

•Children can describe the features of different climates such as temperate, arid and subtropical.

•Children can describe patterns of human distribution around rivers.

•Children can explain how The Andes is used by the people who live on or near the mountains.

•Children can explore their local area and make observations.

•Children can carry out a local study of the River Hull using a range of sources and fieldwork.

•Children can describe changes to the River Hull over times using a range of sources.

•Children can give ways to to conserve water for sustainable living.

•Children can describe the impact of trade.

•Children can describe the impact that globalisation has had on international trade.

•Children can investigate using a range of sources.

•Children can use a range of sources to find out how trading has changed over time.