History

Craven History Curriculum

History Curriculum Design

Our history sequence in KS1 build upon the childrens knowledge of new and old from EYFS. We build the historical knowledge up KS1 by first starting it as local history of place and local heroes, so that children can then relate to the changes within their community. As children move into Year 2, children they study international heroes; this is placed along side geography knowledge of other countries so children are able to further understand how important people such as Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks made a difference to another country. Children's understanding of monarchy and castles is also placed in Year 2 so that the geographical content of the UK helps them to put into context where Kings and Queens made a difference to in the UK.

As children move into KS2, the history curriculum is structured so that children study times and civilizations in chronological order. By doing this it allows the children to build a better understanding of how civilisations how risen and fallen and what has led to present day. They can put technological, social, political and environmental factors into context and understand how the civilisations in which they have previously studied impact upon what they are currently studying. History knowledge is placed in the Autumn and Spring term so that it can be revisted and used to support the geography based topics later in the year.

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Autumn

Local History

This is the children’s first encounter with history and they are aiming to identify, through artefacts, pictures, videos, experiences etc, which toys, fairground rides, amenities in Hull are old and which are new, and give reasons for their enquiry. Children can explore how toys have changed as time has gone on, and begin to understand the word ‘chronological’ being able to put toys, artefacts of familiar objects into the correct order.

National History

Children become familiar with the idea of Monarchy and understanding of ruling the country. Children become familiar with Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth I. and should look to have an understanding of significant events/choices in their lives and understand the consequences. This gives them an understanding of UK history.  Children make links between rulers and castles and can explore how castles developed and the features of them.

Early British Civilisations

Children study the period of British history from the Stone Age to the Iron Age. Children investigate who the ‘hunter-gatherers’ were and learn how they survived in Stone Age Britain. They explore how we can know about the period in history with a lack of written primary sources, introducing them to the concept of making deductions from evidence such as artefacts. Children study the changes between the Stone Age and the Bronze Age, including the implications of the discovery of bronze and explore why bronze was so important. Children explore what life was like in an Iron Age hill fort and how times changed throughout the periods. 

Early Civilisations

Children learn about the Roman Empire and the impact on modern day Britain. They look at Roman conquest and rule. They understand the way of life of the Romans and understand Britain as part of the Roman Empire. They use historical skills to find out about the past. They learn about the Roman army, Julius Ceaser and invasion.

British History

Children study the invaders and settlers of the Saxons and Vikings. Children explore who ruled Britain and how it was divided into kingdoms. Children follow on from the Saxons to study the Viking raids and invasion. They consider the battles between the Saxons and the Vikings and look at life during that time.

Modern British History

Children learn about Victorian Britain and what life was like for people in those times. They compare the lives of rich and poor people using a range of sources. They know what life was like for children in the Victorian times, including the jobs they did and the school environment. They will develop an understanding of society and ways of life for Victorians. They look at primary sources of evidence detailing beliefs about cures and medicines during the Victorian Era and they look at the impact of Florence Nightingale on nursing and sanitation. They will also look at the law system and compare it to today.

Spring

Modern Local Heroes

Children ask and answer questions about local heroes. Children study the local heroes Amy Johnson and Lillian Billoca. They learn about how Lillian Billocca’s campaigning improved safety for fishermen and that Amy Johnson was the first English female pilot to fly solo. Children describe where Amy Johnson and Lillian Billoca fit within time using a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms. Children use parts of stories and other sources to understand the key events that the significant individuals caused to happen.

International Heroes

Children study significant figures in the American civil rights movement such as Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks. They also study significant women and learn how in the past women fought for the right to vote and changed the future for women. 

Early Civilisations

Children study the early civilisation Ancient Egypt. They understand the location of Ancient Egypt in time and place and study the way of life in Ancient Egypt. They explore the factual evidence of the tombs, pyramids, mummies and burial sites. They learn about the importance of artefacts in helping us find out about the facts. They find out how Howard Carter, the British archaeologist, helped us through his discovery of Tutankhamen’s tomb in 1922.

Early Civilisations

Children study Ancient Greece and the influence the ancient Greeks had on the western world. They consider the impact of the ancient Greek civilisation on life today by exploring things such as the Olympic Games, theatres and universities. They understand the location of ancient Greece in time and place. They explore the daily lives of the ancient Greeks and who, and what , they believed in by discovering their religions. Children explore the differences between Athens and Sparta and learn about the term ‘democracy’. They investigate ancient Greek warfare through the use of artefacts and sources.

British History

Children study the Mayan civilisation. They learn about how the Mayan civilisation developed over time by exploring a range of artefacts. Children explore how Mayan society was organised by learning about different groups of Mayan people from kings and nobles to slaves and farmers as well as how Mayans lived in various independent city states. Children also investigate Mayan religion and beliefs and find out what everyday life was like for Mayan people. At the end of the unit children learn about the decline of the Mayan civilisation.

Modern British History

Children study World War 2 as a significant event in British history. They learn about the causes of WW2 and what life was like for people during those times, with a particular focus on what life was like for children as an evacuee. They study the Blitz and learn about how the English port city of Hull was targeted. They explore propaganda and the impact it had on society. They also look at the treatment of Jews and the holocaust. They study the impact of the war on trade links and look at rationing. They complete the unit by learning about how WW2 came to an end and VE Day.

Summer

Local History

Children explore Hull’s fishing industry, which is an important part of our local history. They look at the Triple Trawler Disaster and the fishing and whaling industry. They understand the importance of the fishing industry in Hull’s timeline and this builds up their historical knowledge of Hull.

National and International History

Children study how transport has changed over time. They compare the modes of transport now to those in the past. They find out about the invention of trains and how this affected travel. They also find out about the invention of motor cars and look at how cars have changed. They are introduced to the Wright Brothers and will study the first aeroplane flights. They also explore the first landing on the moon and investigate the journey that it took to get a man to be able to walk on the moon.

 

 

 

 

No history covered

What vocabulary will be covered in our History curriculum

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Autumn

History

Old

New

Rich

Poor

Hull Fair

Change

Year

Chronology

Past

Royals

Technology

Impact

Duties

Parliament

Leader

Decade

Monarchy

Prehistoric

BC / AD

Neolithic (New)

Mesolithic (Middle)

Palaeolithic (Old)

Hunter Gatherers

Foraging

Improvements

Tools and Technology

Settlements

Ancient

Century

Empire

Emperor

Julius Caesar

Claudius

Invasion

Dictator

Conquest

Advancements

Barbarians

Weaponry

Architecture

Influence

Romanisation

Legacy

Seize

Speculation

Raids

Influence

Monasteries

Treaty

Law and Justice

Execution

Successor

Millenium

Alfred the Great

Danegeld

Danelaw

Edward the Confessor

Family Tree

Hierarchy

Industrialisation

Progression and Advancements

Reign

Wealth gap

Workhouse

Victorian

Values

Juvenile

Spring

Aeroplane

Headscarf

Fishermen

Trawlers

Local hero

City

Actions

Lives

Protest

Discrimination

Civil Rights

Movement

Race

Equality

Speeches

Suffragettes

Pyramids

Sphynx

Bias

Pharaoh

Tutankhamun

Tomb

Preservation

Temple

Sacrifice

Mummification

Philosopher

Athenians

University

Spartan

Democracy

Civilisation

City-state

Bloodletting

Ritual

Pok-ta-Pok

Mesoamerica

Modern British History

Blitz

Evacuee

Propaganda

Allies

Axis

Scapegoat

Systematic extermination

Holocaust

Nazi

Facism

Summer

North Sea

Trawlermen

Docks

Ports

Equator

North Pole

South Pole

Transport

Inventions

The Wright Brothers

Motor car

Vehicle

Moon Landing

Spacecraft

Apollo 11

 

 

 

 

No history covered

What knowledge will the children gain in History?

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Autumn

•Children know the meaning of the word ‘old’ and ‘new’.

•They can identify toys are ‘old’ and which are ‘new’.

•Children know what is similar about toys and what is different.

•Children should know which toys would be played with by rich children and which would be played by poor children from the selection studied.

•Know toys of the Victorian era.

•They know which toys are from very recent times in history.

•Children know how Hull Fair has changed and are able to identify differences between photos from different eras.

•Children know that historically there has been ‘boy’ toys and ‘girl’ toys but understand that this has changed.

•Children will understand the concept of the ‘past’.

•Children will understand the word ‘royal’ and identify royal family members both old and new.

•Children can understand that older royals were painted but new ones are photographed because of technology.

•Children will be able to identify that Queen Elizabeth I lived long ago (1553 – 1603).

•Children will know that Queen Victoria lived more recently than Queen Elizabeth I, but still a long time ago (1837 – 1876).

•Children will know basic facts about the two monarchs.

•Children will understand the impact that the two Queens had on our country.

•Children will understand that Kings and Queens are ‘born’.

•Children will know some of the duties of a Queen.

•Children will form a basic understanding of Parliament.

•Children will consider the characteristics of a ‘leader’.

•Children know what the term ‘prehistoric’ means.

•Children learn about what ‘archaeology’ means.

•Children will know the meaning of the terms ‘Neolithic’ (New Stone Age), ‘Mesolithic’ (Middle Stone Age) and ‘Palaeolithic’ (Old Stone Age).

•They can identify who the ‘hunter gatherers’ were and that their lives revolved around foraging for food.

•Children will know what Stone Age and Iron Age life was like by studying artefacts.

•Children know that tools improved from Stone Age to Iron Age because of the use of metals and better quality craftsmanship.

•Children know that clothing developed from simple use of animal skin to clothes made with the fur of animals.

•Children know that food practices improved through development of tools and technology – farming emerged and hunter gathering was not as necessary in the Iron Age.

•Children will know that during the Iron Age, people started to settle in one place and more permanent settlements were built. Children will know this after looking at Skara Brae.

•Children will understand the significance of Stonehenge and that it is hard to know exactly what it was used for.

•Children will know that the Romans came from Italy, where they first started to establish their Empire between 27 BC – 476 AD.

•Children will know the reasons for the Romans wanting to expand their Empire, including: acquiring new wealth, highlighting the power and might of the Emperor, gaining resources, etc.

•In AD 43, the Romans invaded Britain and it became part of the Empire.

•Children will know that Emperor Claudius was in charge at the time of the invasion.

•Children will know about the life of Julius Caesar and that he became dictator of the Roman Empire.

•Children will know that before the successful invasion, Caesar had tried to invade previously in 55 BC.

•Children will know about the might of the Roman Army and their advancements with weaponry and tactics.

•Children will know that Hadrian’s wall was built to keep the ‘barbarians from the North’ out.

•Children will know that Boudicca led a rebellion by the Iceni tribe in 60 AD against the Romans. However, they were defeated and couldn’t compete with the might of the Roman army.

•They will understand the importance of Roman architecture and that their influence is still seen today.

•Children will know what the Romans did for entertainment: gladiator/animal fights and chariot racing.

•Children will be able to see the lasting legacy of the Romanisation of Britain, including their place names and a roads infrastructure that still lasts to this day.

•Children should know the speculated reasons why Anglo-Saxons began to settle in Britain: farming potential, invited by the British, own homeland flooded, etc.

•Children will know how the Anglo Saxons used certain artefacts that are studied.

•Children will know that the initial Viking raids were to acquire wealth and possessions. Monasteries were targeted because of their weak defences and high valued possessions. Vikings were surprised how easy they were to seize.

•Children will know that the Vikings seized Jorvik (York) as their capital.

•They will know that the Viking longboats were a technological advancement: they were light, durable and fast. They influenced shipbuilding for centuries after.

•Children will know that in 886 AD, Alfred (King of Wessex) agreed to a peace treaty with the Vikings. The Anglo-Saxons had the area ‘Wessex’ and the Vikings had ‘Danelaw’.

•King Athelstan broke the peace treaty and seized York in 927 AD to become the first Anglo-Saxon ruler of England.

•Children will know of many Anglo-Saxon laws and elements of justice, including having to pay money to a dead person’s relatives if you killed them and the lack of prison – people were punished with fines or executed instead.

•They will know Edward the Confessor (the last Anglo-Saxon king of England) built Westminster Abbey.

•He died in 1066 and his successor, Harold, was defeated by William the Conqueror that same year in the Battle of Hastings. This marked the end of Anglo-Saxon Britain.

•The children will know that the Victorian era occurred between the years of 1837-1901, corresponding with the years of the reign of Queen Victoria.

•The children will know key facts about Queen Victoria, including her year of birth (1819), the year she became Queen (1837), her husband (Albert)  and children (Victoria, Edward, Alice, Alfred, Helena, Louise, Arthur, Leopold and Beatrice).

•They will understand and know that the Victoria Era was one of key inventions and progressions, including: bicycles, cars, trains, lightbulbs, radios, sewing machines, the toilet etc.

•There were also key advancements in medicine, science and technology.

•The children will know about the workhouse, which emerged with the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834. In 1861, over 35,000 children were living and working in Victorian workhouses.

•Children will know about the wealth gap between the rich and the poor, and that this led to children having to seek employment. Jobs included mining, factory work, street sweeping and servants.

•Children will learn about the life of Dr Thomas Barnardo and his work to end child poverty (especially for boys) in Britain.

•Children will know that Victorian schooling was harsh and extremely different to the values for education we have today. After 1870, all children under 12 had to attend school.

•Children will understand law and justice during the Victorian era, and that until this point, young children were punished in the same way as adults. The Juvenile Offences Act of 1847 came in and said that young people (up to 16) should be tried in a special court, not an adult court.

•Instead of prison, most young people were sent to a Reformatory School, established in 1854.

•From 1899, children were no longer sent to adult prisons at all.

Spring

•Children know that photos taken a long time ago were black and white.

•Children know that clothes have changed over time.

•Children know who Amy Johnson was and some of her achievements: the first woman to fly solo from Britain to Australia, she travelled across the Atlantic to America, her moth plane was called Jason, etc.

•Children know who Lillian Bilocca was and some of her achievements: her actions of protest led to the ‘Fishermen’s Charter’ which led to safer conditions for Hull’s trawlermen.

•Children know that both of these women were born in Hull and are local heroes.

•Children know that women achieving things was more unusual during this time in history.

•Children know that things should be safe for people while they are working their job.

•Children know what a protest is and how it can inspire change.

•Children know that these women have had a big impact and things changed because of their actions and lives.

•Children understands that discrimination involves people being treated differently for something they can’t control or change.

•Children will know that sometimes people are discriminated against because of their race or gender.

•Children will be aware of the Civil Rights Movement and that it focused on all races being treated the same.

•Children will know that Martin Luther King Jr. was a key person of the Civil Rights movement who fought for equality.

•Children will know about the ‘I Have a Dream’ speech and that speeches are an effective way of inspiring change.

•Children will know that Rosa Parks was a black woman who refused to give up her seat to a white person on the bus. She did not think it was fair so she refused.

•Children will know that lots of people supported Rosa Parks and protested for change (link to Lillian Bilocca in Y1).

•Children will know that sometimes people have had to break the rules to fight for what is right because not all rules are fair for all people.

•Children will know that Emmeline Pankhurst fought for the right for women to vote.

•Children will know that the suffragettes were a group of women who fought for their rights.

•Children will know the terms BC and AD confidently.

•Children will know about archaeology in further depth after studying it once more. They will know that archaeologists help us find out about the past.

•Children will know about bias in art to show leaders as being powerful.

•Children will know about architectural achievements from Ancient Egyptian times such as the pyramids and the sphynx.

•Children will understand that a Pharaoh is an Egyptian leader and be able to link this to previously studied leaders.

•Children will understand that Pharaohs were buried in tombs to preserve them, making these ideal for archaeologists to find out about the past.

•Children will know about the Pharaoh Tutankhamun and that his tomb was one of the best preserved ever.

•Children will know that Egyptians believed that Pharaohs became gods upon death and that they worshipped through temples, praying and sacrifices.

•Children will know about the process of mummification and the significance of this.

•Children will know about the lives of Ancient Egyptians.

•Children will know that papyrus (paper) was first widely used during the Ancient Egyptian period.

•Children will know where Ancient Greece fits into their expanding timeline.

•Children will know how the Ancient Greeks lived.

•Children will know about religious beliefs of the Greeks as well as their culture.

•Children will know that the theatre played a huge role in Ancient Greece and that comedies and tragedies started here.

•Children will know some of the famous Ancient Greek myths, including: Theseus and Minotaur, Achilles, Hercules, etc.

•Children will know about philosophers such as Aristotle, Plato and Socrates and their important teachings. They will know that their wise ideas left a lasting legacy and we still feel their effects today.

•Children will know about the value of education in Ancient Greece and that it is thought that Ancient Greeks were the first creators of universities.

•Children will know about the Spartan army and their emphasis on strength and fighting ability (Link to Romans in Autumn term).

•Children will know about democracy and how the democratic system aims for fairness (contrast this with the dictator of Julius Caesar).

•Children will know that the Mayan civilisation spanned an extremely long time and have a knowledge of reasons for this.

•Children will know the Maya fit in relation to other history topics studied.

•Children will know where the Maya were located and understand that this is now known as Central America.

•Children will know roles Mayans had in their society such as slaves, farmers and nobles.

•Children will know the hierarchy of workers during Mayan times.

•Children will have a strong knowledge of Mayan gods, with each one having a different purpose, and their beliefs in the afterlife.

•Children will know about Mayan celebrations and festivals. They will know that these are held with great religious significance and contain practices such as bloodletting and sacrifice.

•Children will know about the Mayan ball game ‘Pok-ta-Pok’ and its religious significance.

•Children will know that the Mayan land was home to many city states that had their own rules, governments and leaders. This led to conflict .These states include Chichen Itza, Paleque and Copan, amongst others.

•Children will know that Frederick Catherwood was an explorer who discovered the ruins of many city states and painted pictures of them.

•Children will know the key reasons for World War II beginning, most significantly the invasion of Poland by Germany.

•Children will know that Adolf Hitler was Germany’s leader at this time.

•Children will know sides that were Allies, such as Britain, France and USA, and sides that were Axis, such as Germany and Italy.

•Children will know that Britain declared war against Germany on 3rd September 1939.

•Children will know that bombing was a key strategy of both sides during the war.

•Children will know that air raid shelters were a structure of defence against this bombing.

•Children will know that Hull was the second most severely damaged city after London during the Blitz. This was down to its role as a key port at the time.

•Children will know that children became evacuees and were evacuated from the badly bombed cities into the countryside.

•Children will know about rationing due to scarce amounts of food and understand the impact of this.

•Children will learn about propaganda and how this was used by both sides to get support and paint images of strong leadership.

•Children will also know that Germany used propaganda to portray Jews in a negative way.

•Children will know that Jewish people were treated extremely badly during World War II and that the Nazis blamed them for Germany’s weak position after World War I up to the start of World War II – scapegoats.

•Children will know that concentration camps existed and that Jews suffered from systematic extermination by the Nazis.

•Children will know that the Allies won the war after the German army was weakened and the leadership disintegrated.

 

 

 

Summer

•Children will know how this links to previous work on Lillian Bilocca.

•Children will know that Hull has big links to fishing.

•Children will know that Hull is a city with ports and docks.

•Children will know that lots of people in Hull had jobs on trawlers.

•Children will know that a trawler is a large steamboat used to catch lots of fish.

•Children will know that being a Trawlerman was a dangerous job.

•          Children will know about the invention of trains and the impact this had.

•          Children will know about the invention of motor cars and the impact this had.

•          Children will know how cars have changed over time.

•          Children will know how the Wright Brothers were the first ever people to fly properly in 1903. They then flew the first fully practical plane in 1905.

•          Children will know that cars were at first for wealthy people but that they have become common and affordable over time.

•          Children will know that Neil Armstrong was the first man to land on the moon in 1969.

•          Children will know that the spacecraft was called Apollo 11.

•          Children will know that all of these modes of transport have changed and improved over time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No history covered

What skills will the children develop in History?

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

History Progression

Autumn

Knowledge and Interpretation

•They can use the words ‘old’ and ‘new’ to describe toys.

•They can explain why toys at Hull Fair have changed.

•They can explain why some toys are labelled as ‘boys’ or ‘girls’ toys and give reasons for this.

•They know that views have changed over time.

•They can explain that old toys were made with different materials to new toys.

•They use the words ‘rich’ and ‘poor’ to describe people.

•They can suggest which toys might be played with by ‘rich’ children and ‘poor’ children.

•They can explain what Hull Fair is.

Chronological Understanding

•They can put toys in order from ‘oldest’ to ‘newest’ and explain their choices.

Historical Enquiry

•Children can use images and artefacts provided by the teacher to come up with ideas about the past.

•They can explain what is the ‘same’ and what is ‘different’.

•Children can use images and artefacts provided by the teacher to come up with ideas about the past.

•Children can use images and artefacts provided by the teacher to come up with ideas about the past.

•They can explain what is the ‘same’ and what is ‘different’.

•Children can use images and artefacts provided by the teacher to come up with ideas about the past.

•They can explain what is the ‘same’ and what is ‘different’.

•They can use images and artefacts provided by the teacher to come up with ideas about the past.

•They can use images and artefacts provided by the teacher to come up with ideas about the past.

 

Knowledge and Interpretation

•They can identify how they know artefacts and sources are from the past or present.

•They can explain the role of the Queen and what this involves.

•They can explain the role of the Queen and what this involves.

•They can explain the impact of an individual on a country or setting.

•They can explain the purpose of parliament.

•They can show their understanding of parliament at two different points in history.

•They can explain the role of the Queen and what this involves.

•They can explain the impact of an individual on a country or setting.

•They can identify and present attributes that make a good leader.

Chronological Understanding

• They can use the word ‘past’ to describe events.

• They can sequence dated events provided by the teacher.

•They can show to a basic level how parliament has changed over time.

Historical Enquiry

•They can use two or more sources provided by the teacher to find out information.

•They can use two or more sources provided by the teacher to find out information.

•They can write information found out from research.

•They can use two or more sources provided by the teacher to find out information.

•They can write information found out from research.

 

 

Knowledge and Interpretation

•They can begin to picture what life would have been like for the early settlers.

•They can begin to picture what life would have been like for the early settlers.

•They can suggest why certain events happened as they did in history.

•They can suggest why certain people acted as they did in history.

•They can begin to picture what life would have been like for the early settlers.

•They can suggest why certain events happened as they did in history.

•They can begin to picture what life would have been like for the early settlers.

•They can suggest why certain events happened as they did in history.

•They can suggest why certain people acted as they did in history.

•They can suggest why certain people acted as they did in history.

Chronological Understanding

•They can use a timeline within a specific time in history to set out the order things may have happened.

•They can describe events and periods using the words: BC, AD and decade.

•They can describe events from the past using dates when things happened.

•They can describe events and periods using the words: BC, AD and decade.

•They can describe events from the past using dates when things happened.

•They can describe events and periods using the words: ancient and century.

•They can use a timeline within a specific time in history to set out the order things may have happened.

Historical Enquiry

•They recognise the part that archaeologists have had in helping us understand more about what happened in the past.

•They can use their ‘information finding’ skills in writing to help them write about historical information.

•They recognise the part that archaeologists have had in helping us understand more about what happened in the past.

•They use various sources to piece together information about a period in history.

•They use various sources to piece together information about a period in history.

•They can use various sources to piece together information about a period in history.

•They can use their ‘information finding’ skills in writing to help them write about historical information.

•They can research and identify similarities and differences between given periods in history.

•They can use their ‘information finding’ skills in writing to help them write about historical information.

•They can research and identify similarities and differences between given periods in history.

•They recognise the part that archaeologists have had in helping us understand more about what happened in the past.

•They can use various sources of evidence to answer questions.

•They can use various sources to piece together information about a period in history.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Knowledge and Interpretation

• They appreciate that wars have happened from a very long time ago and it is often associated with invasion, conquering or religious differences.

• They appreciate that wars have happened from a very long time ago and it is often associated with invasion, conquering or religious differences.

• They appreciate how items found belonging to the past are helping us to build up an accurate picture of how people lived in the past.

They appreciate that wars have happened from a very long time ago and it is often associated with invasion, conquering or religious differences.

• They appreciate that wars have happened from a very long time ago and it is often associated with invasion, conquering or religious differences.

• They recognise that the lives of wealthy people were very different from those of poor people.

•They appreciate how items found belonging to the past are helping us to build up an accurate picture of how people lived in the past.

Chronological Understanding

• They can place periods of history on a timeline showing periods of time.

Historical Enquiry

• They can communicate knowledge and understanding orally and in writing and offer points of view based upon what they have found out.

• They can give more than one reason to support an historical argument.

• They can give more than one reason to support an historical argument.

• They can communicate knowledge and understanding orally and in writing and offer points of view based upon what they have found out.

•They can give more than one reason to support an historical argument.

•They can research two versions of an event and say how they differ.

•They can research what it was like for a child in a given period from the past and use photographs and illustrations to present their findings they can communicate knowledge and understanding orally and in writing and offer points of view based upon what they have found out.

•They communicate knowledge and understanding orally and in writing and offer points of view based upon what they have found out.

Knowledge and Interpretation

• They can describe historical events from the different period/s they are studying/have studied.

•They can explain the role that Britain has had in spreading Christian values across the world.

•They appreciate that significant events in history has helped shape the country we have today.

•They can describe historical events from the different period/s they are studying/have studied.

•They have a good understanding as to how crime and punishment has changed over the years.

•They can describe historical events from the different period/s they are studying/have studied.

•They appreciate that significant events in history has helped shape the country we have today.

Chronological Understanding

•They can use dates and historical language in their work.

•They can use dates and historical language in their work.

•They can draw a timeline with different time periods outlined which show different information, such as, periods of history, when famous people lived, etc..

•They can use their mathematical skills to work exact time scales and differences as need be.

Historical Enquiry

• They appreciate how historical artefacts have helped us understand more about British lives in the present and past.

•They can test out a hypothesis in order to answer a question.

 

 

 

Knowledge and Interpretation

•They can describe features of historical events and people from past societies and periods they have studied.

•They can recognise and describe differences and similarities/ changes and continuity between different periods of history.

•They can describe features of historical events and people from past societies and periods they have studied.

•They can describe features of historical events and people from past societies and periods they have studied.

•They can summarise what Britain may have learnt from other countries and civilizations through time gone by and more recently.

•They can describe features of historical events and people from past societies and periods they have studied.

•They can describe features of historical events and people from past societies and periods they have studied.

•They can recognise and describe differences and similarities/ changes and continuity between different periods of history.

•They can summarise how Britain has had a major influence on world history.

•They can summarise what Britain may have learnt from other countries and civilizations through time gone by and more recently.

Chronological Understanding

•They can say where a period of history fits on a timeline.

•They can place a specific event on a timeline by decade.

•They can place features of historical events and people from past societies and periods in a chronological framework.

•They can place features of historical events and people from past societies and periods in a chronological framework.

•They can place features of historical events and people from past societies and periods in a chronological framework.

Historical Enquiry

•They can describe a key event from Britain’s past using a range of evidence from different sources.

•They can look at two different versions and say how the author may be attempting to persuade or give a specific viewpoint.

•They can look at two different versions and say how the author may be attempting to persuade or give a specific viewpoint.

•They can describe a key event from Britain’s past using a range of evidence from different sources.

 

Spring

Knowledge and Interpretation

•They can use the words ‘old’ and ‘new’ to describe local people and landmarks.

•They can present information about a famous local person.

•They can present information about a famous local person.

•They can create a protest sign using their knowledge of protesting.

•They can explain the impact of local heroes and changes that they made.

•They can present information using rehearsed oracy.

Chronological Understanding

•They can put Hull landmarks in order from ‘oldest’ to ‘newest’ and explain their choices.

•They can create a basic timeline with adult support.

Historical Enquiry

•Children can use images and artefacts provided by the teacher to come up with ideas about the past.

•Children can use images and artefacts provided by the teacher to come up with ideas about the past.

•They can use images and artefacts provided by the teacher to create their poster.

Knowledge and Interpretation

•They can explain who Martin Luther King Jr was and why he is important.

•They can explain why speeches are effective for getting messages across.

•They can explain who Rosa Parks is and why she is important.

•They can explain that women haven’t always had the same rights as men.

•They can explain that women haven’t always had the same rights as men.

•Children can create a movement through their understanding of things in history that people have had to fight for.

Chronological Understanding

•They can use the word ‘discrimination’ to describe events in history and today.

•They can understand that people’s views have changed during history.

•They can understand that people’s views have changed during history.

•They can understand that people’s views have changed during history.

Historical Enquiry

•They can use two or more sources provided by the teacher to find out information.

•They can use two or more sources provided by the teacher to find out information.

•They can write information found out from research.

•They can use two or more sources provided by the teacher to find out information.

•They can write information found out from research.

•They can use two or more sources provided by the teacher to find out information.

•They can write information found out from research.

Knowledge and Interpretation

•They can describe events and periods using the words: BC, AD and decade.

•They can suggest why certain events happened as they did in history.

•They can suggest why certain people acted as they did in history.

•They can suggest why certain people acted as they did in history.

•They can suggest why certain events happened as they did in history.

•They can suggest why certain people acted as they did in history.

•They can begin to picture what life would have been like for the early settlers.

•They can suggest why certain events happened as they did in history.

•They can suggest why certain people acted as they did in history.

Chronological Understanding

•They can use a timeline within a specific time in history to set out the order things may have happened.

•They can describe events and periods using the words: BC, AD and decade.

•They can describe events from the past using dates when things happened.

•They can describe events from the past using dates when things happened.

•They can describe events and periods using the words: ancient and century.

Historical Enquiry

•They recognise the part that archaeologists have had in helping us understand more about what happened in the past

•They recognise the part that archaeologists have had in helping us understand more about what happened in the past.

•They can use their ‘information finding’ skills in writing to help them write about historical information.

•They recognise the part that archaeologists have had in helping us understand more about what happened in the past.

•They use various sources to piece together information about a period in history.

•They use various sources to piece together information about a period in history.

•They can use various sources to piece together information about a period in history.

•They can use their ‘information finding’ skills in writing to help them write about historical information.

•They can use their ‘information finding’ skills in writing to help them write about historical information.

•They recognise the part that archaeologists have had in helping us understand more about what happened in the past.

•They can identify similarities and differences between given periods in history.

• They can research a specific period in history.

 

Knowledge and Interpretation

•They can explain how events from the past have helped shape our lives.

•They can appreciate how items found belonging to the past are helping us to build up an accurate picture of how people lived in the past.

•They appreciate how items found belonging to the past are helping us to build up an accurate picture of how people lived in the past.

•They can explain how events from the past has helped shape our lives.

•They recognise that the lives of wealthy people were very different from those of poor people.

•They appreciate that wars have happened from a very long time ago and it is often associated with invasion, conquering or religious differences.

•They can explain how events from the past have helped shape our lives.

•They can explain how events from the past have helped shape our lives.

Chronological Understanding

•They can place periods of history on a timeline showing periods of time.

Historical Enquiry

•They can give more than one reason to support an historical argument.

•They can communicate knowledge and understanding orally and in writing and offer points of view based upon what they have found out.

•They can communicate knowledge and understanding orally and in writing and offer points of view based upon what they have found out.

•They can give more than one reason to support an historical argument.

•They can communicate knowledge and understanding orally and in writing and offer points of view based upon what they have found out.

•They can give more than one reason to support an historical argument.

•They can research what it was like for a child in a given period from the past.

•They can communicate knowledge and understanding orally and in writing and offer points of view based upon what they have found out.

•They can give more than one reason to support an historical argument.

•They communicate knowledge and understanding orally and in writing and offer points of view based upon what they have found out.

•They communicate knowledge and understanding orally and in writing and offer points of view based upon what they have found out.

Knowledge and Interpretation

•They can describe historical events from the different period/s they are studying/have studied.

•They can make comparisons between historical periods.

•They can explain the role that Britain has had in spreading Christian values across the world.

•They appreciate that significant events in history have helped shape the country we have today.

•They can describe historical events from the different period/s they are studying/have studied.

•They can make comparisons between historical periods; explaining things that have changed and things which have stayed the same.

•They can describe historical events from the different period/s they are studying/have studied.

•They can describe historical events from the different period/s they are studying/have studied.

•They can make comparisons between historical periods; explaining things that have changed and things which have stayed the same.

•They have a good understanding as to how crime and punishment has changed over the years.

Chronological Understanding

•They can use dates and historical language in their work.

• They can use dates and historical language in their work.

•They can use dates and historical language in their work.

•They can use their mathematical skills to work exact time scales and differences as need be.

Historical Enquiry

•They appreciate how historical artefacts have helped us understand more about lives of the past.

•They can test out a hypothesis in order to answer a question.

•They appreciate how historical artefacts have helped us understand more about lives of the past.

Knowledge and Interpretation

•They can describe features of historical events and people from past societies and periods they have studied.

•They can summarise the main events from a specific period in history, explaining the order in which key events happened.

•They can describe features of historical events and people from past societies and periods they have studied.

•They can recognise and describe differences and similarities/ changes and continuity between different periods of history.

•They can describe features of historical events and people from past societies and periods they have studied.

•They can summarise what Britain may have learnt from other countries and civilisations though time gone by and more recently.

•They can recognise and describe differences and similarities/ changes and continuity between different periods of history.

•They can describe features of historical events and people from past societies and periods they have studied.

•They can describe features of historical events and people from past societies and periods they have studied.

•They can summarise how Britain has had a major influence on world history.

•They can summarise what Britain may have learnt from other countries and civilizations through time gone by and more recently.

Chronological Understanding

•They can say where a period of history fits on a timeline.

•They can place a specific event on a timeline by decade.

•They can place features of historical events and people from past societies and periods in a chronological framework.

•They can place features of historical events and people from past societies and periods in a chronological framework.

Historical Enquiry

• They can describe a key event from Britain’s past using a range of evidence from different sources.

•They can describe a key event from Britain’s past using a range of evidence from different sources.

•They can look at two different versions and say how the author may be attempting to persuade or give a specific viewpoint.

•They can look at two different versions and say how the author may be attempting to persuade or give a specific viewpoint.

•They can identify and explain their understanding of propaganda.

•They can identify and explain their understanding of propaganda.

•They can look at two different versions and say how the author may be attempting to persuade or give a specific viewpoint.

•They can look at two different versions and say how the author may be attempting to persuade or give a specific viewpoint.

•They can describe a key event from Britain’s past using a range of evidence from different sources.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer

Knowledge and Interpretation

•They can present information about famous people and events.

•They can explain how things of change.

Historical Enquiry

•Children can use images, artefacts and sources provided by the teacher to come up with ideas about the past.

Chronological Understanding

•They can create a basic timeline with adult support.

•They can use years to talk about events.

Knowledge and Interpretation

•They can present and compare information about famous people and events.

•They can give several reasons how and why things of change.

Chronological Understanding

•They can create a basic timeline.

•They can use years and decades to talk about events.

Historical Enquiry

•Children can use images and artefacts provided by the teacher to come up with ideas about the past and ask new questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No history cover 

 

 

 

 

What skills will children learn in our History Curriculum?

Year Group

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Autumn

Knowledge and Interpretation

•They can use the words ‘old’ and ‘new’ to describe toys.

•They can explain why toys at Hull Fair have changed.

•They can explain why some toys are labelled as ‘boys’ or ‘girls’ toys and give reasons for this.

•They know that views have changed over time.

•They can explain that old toys were made with different materials to new toys.

•They use the words ‘rich’ and ‘poor’ to describe people.

•They can suggest which toys might be played with by ‘rich’ children and ‘poor’ children.

•They can explain what Hull Fair is.

Chronological Understanding

•They can put toys in order from ‘oldest’ to ‘newest’ and explain their choices.

Historical Enquiry

•Children can use images and artefacts provided by the teacher to come up with ideas about the past.

•They can explain what is the ‘same’ and what is ‘different’.

•Children can use images and artefacts provided by the teacher to come up with ideas about the past.

•Children can use images and artefacts provided by the teacher to come up with ideas about the past.

•They can explain what is the ‘same’ and what is ‘different’.

•Children can use images and artefacts provided by the teacher to come up with ideas about the past.

•They can explain what is the ‘same’ and what is ‘different’.

•They can use images and artefacts provided by the teacher to come up with ideas about the past.

•They can use images and artefacts provided by the teacher to come up with ideas about the past.

 

Knowledge and Interpretation

•They can identify how they know artefacts and sources are from the past or present.

•They can explain the role of the